Migration reporting toolkit for journalists launches on World Refugee Day

The Ethical Journalism Network has worked with the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA)European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and European Federation of Journalists (EFJ) to develop an online resource for journalists reporting on migration.

The online e-Media toolkit, designed by journalists for journalists, is now available . It provides first-hand assistance to media professionals with learning resources, training courses and opportunities to share and interact.

Drawing on input from leading media outlets like Agence France-Presse, Le MondeThe GuardianRadio France International,France TV, the BBC, and the Financial Times, the toolkit offers wide-ranging guidance on covering migration from different types of media.

The toolkit can be accessed here.

Spaces of inclusion

The Council of Europe publication entitled “Spaces of Inclusion – An explorative study on needs of refugees and migrants in the domain of media communication and on responses by community media” has been prepared by experts of the COMMIT Community Media Institute in Austria.

The role played by media in framing the public debate on migration, with often divisive narratives that focus on the threats that refugees and migrants can pose to the security, welfare and cultures of European societies, has attracted much attention in political and academic circles. Ongoing efforts to properly equip and prepare journalists for the challenging task of contextualised and evidence-based reporting on this complex topic are essential. It is equally vital, however, to ensure that sufficient opportunities are provided to migrants and refugees themselves to develop their independent voices and make them heard in public debate.

Based on individual interviews, the qualitative study explores the media habits and particular needs of refugees and migrants in the domain of media communication. Good practice examples show how community media can meet these needs by offering training and spaces for self-representation, and by offering points of entry into local networks. Community media and their bottom-up approach to content production also contribute to a multilingual media environment that reflects the diversity of European societies and includes marginalised communities as respected part of audiences.

#WorldRefugeeDay: How Can We Counter Hateful Narratives?


On the occasion of World Refugee Day, we are pleased to share this contribution from our partner Media Diversity Institute.

It is #WorldRefugeeDay. But while the world celebrates refugees’ contributions, it is important to remember that many countries are being more unkind than ever towards refugees, making life even harder than it already is. At MDI, we have a few tips for how to counter those narratives as a media consumer, producer or civil society activist working with the media.

20 June 2019, World Refugee Day

In 2001 the United Nations constituted The World Refugee day , an observance dedicated to raising awareness of the situation of refugees throughout the world.

Starting from this date, every year on  June 20,  organizations and offices of the United Nations system, and most importantly, governments, civil society, the public and private sectors, schools, universities and, more generally, citizens are invited to participate with initiatives and demonstrations of solidarity and adhesion.

This year,  with the initiative  #StepWithRefugees — Take A Step on World Refugee Day , UNHCR literally invites us to put ourselves in the shoes of those who are forced to walk for miles and miles to reach a safe place.

“Together, we are challenging ourselves to cover two billion kilometers in 12 months, just as refugees worldwide do each year to reach the nearest point of safety” we read on the UNHCR site. 

For anyone who wants to take part in this solidarity challenge, a fit app is made available. Through this tool  the kilometers traveled by each walking, jogging or cycling are added to a global counter.

The symbolic goal is to reach the 2 billion  of kilometers amount, which is the distance that refugees around the world have traveled this year. This campaign is reinforced by the testimonies of those who managed to save themselves only following the act of extreme resilience which is walking for very long distances in the most adverse conditions.

The main aim is to build better  and deeper understanding of refugees real condition.

We, as  New Neighbours,  join this wish, with the  purpose to contribute  moving forward with the project .

Are journalists responsible for the negative view of migration?

 Did European media overstate the importance of migration? Do journalists have a negative view of migration? Are journalists responsible for the negative view of migration? Do the media sensationalize that issues in order to sell papers? These  and other questions emerged during the event on fake news, disinformation, and media narratives on migration in the context of the European Parliament elections, held in Brussels by the think tank Friends Of Europe, as a part of its Migration Action programme. 

The over 200 participants (including journalists from across the EU, researchers from the University of Oxford, the Budapest Business School, and the European Journalism Centre)  painted a complex and nuanced picture of the actual European media system.

Several problems were discussed: the new business models of publishing, the online visualization system, the political affiliation of the media, the sensationalist form of the articles .

Here the full article.

How is Germany’s migration policy perceived abroad?

Germany has received international attention when it comes to migration ever since the country’s acceptance of over one million asylum-seekers in 2015. At the eve of the European Elections, while Right-wing populist and nationalist parties were expected  to gain ground, MEDIENDIENST INTEGRATION asked: What significance does Germany’s migration policy have within other countries in Europe and how is it reported on and perceived by the public? Adéla Jurečková  (Director of the Migration Awareness Program, People in Need Czech Republic), Dr. Myria Georgiou  (Professor of Media and Communications, London School of Economics ) and Dr. Bernd Parusel  (Expert for the Swedish National Contact Point of the European Migration Network (EMN) at the Swedish Migration Agency)  tried to answer  telling what is happening in Czech Republic, Greece, United Kingdom  and Sweden.

Unsurprisingly  Germany’s migration policy’s narration  seems to be shaped on local dominant politics discourse. In Czech Republic for example, a large part of the press select and stress German news on terrorism and crimes committed by migrants to create a sort of warning about what happens to those countries that have more permissive migration policies. In  Greece, public opinion seems to be interested above all in the bond that these policies have with the migrants waiting in the Hellenic territory.

You can find the full article here.